Security


Need to share your computer? Make sure you only have access to your own account. For everyone else, let them use the Guest user account.

What’s a guest account if you may ask. Its an existing (dormant) account on Windows XP that only has very limited user privileges. Anyone using the Guest account can do everything else except install/uninstall programs, delete files (not unless it was created from the Guest account) and change system settings.

Basically anything that administrators can do are disabled in the Guest user account. This however is disabled by default. To enable the Guest user account.

1. Go to the Windows XP Control Panel.

2. Look for the User Accounts icon and open it.

3. You should see the User Accounts window. Click on the Guest icon.

4. You’ll be asked if you want to turn on the guest user account. Click on the Turn On the Guest Account button and you are done.

5. Once it has been enabled, you can click the same icon again to either change the picture (icon) of the guest account or disable it.

Take note though that you can’t set a password for the guest account so practically anyone can use the account once its enabled. Oh, I almost forgot even though guest users can’t do anything to your system, they may still be able to view some of your personal documents if you haven’t set it to private. ^_^

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Here’s a guide to show how you can enable or disable the Windows XP firewall. This will come in handy if you need to troubleshoot your network or if there are applications that needs to have the firewall disabled. To access your Windows XP firewall GUI: 1. Click on Start and click on Control Panel: […]

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I’ve shown you earlier the potential danger of hidden file extensions in Windows XP. This time I’ll show you how to disable this behavior to make your system a tad secure. 1. Open Windows Explorer and click on the Tools menu. 2. Select Folder Options. When a window appears click on the View tab. 3. […]

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Question. Why is it potentially dangerous to have your file extensions hidden? For the sake of answering this question, I’ll provide an example. For this demonstration, I’ve purposely enabled hiding of file extensions on Windows Explorer, which is the default behavior after you install Windows XP. I went to a folder full of executable programs. […]

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This is a password management software review for SurfSecret Keypad. Often times we have a lot of login credentials for the different web services that we subscribe to. Believe it or not, its not easy to remember all your passwords specially if there’s one credential that you don’t use often. Enter SurfSecret Keypad. Before you […]

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Phishing not to be confused with fishing, is an illegal means of obtaining somebody else’s sensitive information such as credit card details, user names or passwords. The way phishing works is that a legitimate looking e-mail is sent to an unwary victim. The phishing e-mail contains a link that directs the victim to a legitimate […]

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For the benefit of those who don’t know, the Windows autoplay feature is actually a security risk. The default behavior of Windows when you insert a CD into a drive or insert a portable drive (USB drive or USB hard disks) is to look for autorun.inf in the root directory and execute embedded commands. While […]

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